Breaking Down Jake Peavy

Pitching isn’t exactly like riding a bike, but as long as Peavy’s mechanics are fine, his command should come back to him. It’ll take repetition before his command is back to where it was from May-July of 2010, but it should come back quicker than his velocity and stamina. That being said, whatever results Peavy sees in spring should be taken with a grain of salt given his command will take some time to return. But, if by some miracle, his command returns after a handful of spring outings and he’s able to locate within the strike zone well, his return schedule could be sped up.

He’s not on the 40-man roster, but Leesman was one of 14 non-roster invitees to spring training. He’s an organizational favorite-also the best pitching prospect in the organization not named sale jerseys, but that’s also not saying much-who posted a nice 3.05 FIP with double-A Birmingham in 2010. Unfortunately, that success has a red flag. Leesman actually had worse results with single-A Winston-Salem before being bumped to Birmingham last season, posting a 5.37 FIP for the Dash in 84.2 innings.

The Knights got off to a slow start and they continue to sputter along leaving them in the cellar of the IL South at 7-20, tied for the worst mark with the Toledo Mud Hens, and in the throes of a five game slide. Duente Heath was the first of what are now 22 transactions with righty Matt Zaleski going on the disabled list, righty Brian Omogrosso (promoted) and lefty Donnie Veal (optioned by the parent White Sox) being the latest to be added to a growing list.

I would keep instant replay away from judgment calls such as whether a runner is safe or out. I would also not use it for balls and strikes. This way, the human element remains in the game and replay is only used when it is absolutely necessary. A play will only come under review when the umpires feel it necessary to do so. Umpires will be evaluated in the same manner they are now. Those that make too many mistakes will not be available to work postseason games and thus will lose out on bigger paychecks.

Stankevitz was quick to point out that Sox relievers Matt Thornton, Octavio Dotel, and Scott Linebrink have combined to allow zero runs in the 7.1 innings pitched through the team’s first six games.

Pena’s an interesting option because the White Sox won’t need a fifth starter more than a few times before early May. Using Pena in a swingman role could allow the Sox to delay their decision on, say, Alejandro de Aza/Brent Lillibridge or at third base for a month longer by carrying an extra position player. Either that, or the Sox could deepen their bullpen by keeping two of Gregory Infante/Jhonny Nunez/Anthony Carter/Freddy Dolsi in case the Sox needed an extra innings-eater to fill Pena’s role when he has an upcoming start. Pena actually had two starts I’d qualify as “good” last year, but those were two of just three career starts-not exactly a good sample size. Plus, Pena is slated to be in the Sox bullpen, so he may not even get a crack at the rotation this spring.

Owens never was the answer in center field, though. At best, Owens projected out to be a player like Luis Castillo-a player who did not get a ton of extra base hits, but was always on the basepaths and creating havoc. Castillo never has had a season in the majors with a slugging percentage over .400, but with the exception of 2001, Castillo has never had a season in which he has had over 400 at-bats and an OPS below .700. In his heyday, Castillo simply got on base enough to make up for his lack of power.